Tribal Program

GRID’s Solar Spring Break is a national alternative break program that has grown from six schools in 2014 to 22 schools in 2019, creating opportunities for students to make a difference in low-income communities while getting hands-on training in renewable energy.
Joseph first heard about GRID Alternatives seven years ago from Lisa Castilone, GRID IE’s Tribal Manager and Outreach Coordinator. After a presentation about job training opportunities and the solar programs that GRID Alternatives offers, Joseph realized the potential impacts that no-cost solar could have for himself and his tribe.
It was a hot, summer day during monsoon season when GRID Alternatives’ Tribal HQ team traveled down dirt-packed New Mexican roads to the tiny town of Ojo Encino on the Navajo Nation.
In a rainy week in June, GRID partnered with the Rosebud Sioux Tribe for a We Build solar installation on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. Two teams of mother-daughter pairs volunteered to install a grid-tied solar PV system.
A first-of-its-kind solar training series is opening doors and launching renewable energy careers for youth on the Bishop Paiute reservation in Southern California.
GRID Alternatives’ Tribal Program and Ecological Action, a student-created nonprofit from Cherry Creek High School in Denver, Colorado, installed solar at Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, serving two veterans.
For three days in early December 2017, GRID Alternatives led a small group of Native American women through the process of refurbishing a Navajo family’s solar system.
A pioneering solar microgrid installed on The Chemeheuvi Reservation in Lake Havasu, California is at the leading edge of the state’s community resiliency efforts.
Stephanie is a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, which has been fighting for the past year to stop construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline through land they hold sacred. When she qualified to get solar through our partnership with the Tribe, she saw it as an opportunity to demonstrate the power of renewable energy and its potential for making her tribe energy sovereign.
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