GRID in the News

“Clean energy should be for everyone, and with a few strategic shifts, it can be,” said report co-author MeLena Hessel, a senior policy advocate with the Environmental Law & Policy Center. “Too often, low-income communities receive the brunt of pollution and the effects of climate change, but are left out of the solutions. This report lays out realistic, common-sense guidelines for utilities to share those solutions — and the clean energy future — with all.”

Bridge House, which was selected as one of the five state nonprofits out of more than 150 applications for $175,000 apiece in funding from the tech giant, this month received the most votes in an online contest to earn another $125,000.

There were more than 7,000 votes cast in the contest.

The $300,000 in new funding for Bridge House will be used to expand its Ready to Work program, which attempts to end homelessness through connecting clients with employment training and opportunities.

Boulder’s Family Learning Center, which is working to mentor and tutor 40 low-income parents in early childhood development, child educational advocacy and early childhood professional development, and Bridge House, the local homelessness services provider behind the Ready to Work program that strives to end homelessness through employment, are competing against three Denver groups for the extra funding.

Mile High United Way, which is working to support the growth of women-owned and minority-owned businesses; GRID Alternatives Colorado, which provides paid training on residential solar installation to income-eligible participants; and Rocky Mountain MicroFinance Institute, which invests in entrepreneurship that is “creating economic and social mobility,” are the other three nonprofits in the contest.

GRID Alternatives is dedicated to advancing solar in the Navajo Nation and throughout Indian Country through its National Tribal Program, established in 2010. The goal of the program is to inform tribes on the possibility of solar and then assist with implementation, from educating on net metering and how to work with utilities to construction safety and installation practices. GRID recruits community members to volunteer to build grid-tied solar projects on homes and community buildings on tribal lands. In many cases, a tribe’s solar installation with GRID is its first.

According to the Solar Foundation’s Solar Industry Diversity Study, women continue to be underrepresented in the solar industry. GRID’s Women in Solar program aims to help participants gain hands-on solar installation experience while working alongside other women of varying experience levels.

The project is part of GRID Alternatives' Women In Solar program. The program works to empower women seeking technical careers in the solar industry.

"Seeing the women on the roof just killing it day after day gave me a lot of encouragement," said Scott.

"GRID brings together women to create a supportive, inclusive environment, where women can work together and gain the skills needed to advance their careers in the clean energy industry," said Adrienne Dorsey, Executive Director of GRID Alternatives Colorado.

The Pueblo West Metropolitan District Board on Tuesday agreed to move forward with a community solar farm proposal that would help bring sustainable energy to Pueblo West.

Jake Bobrow, of GRID Alternatives of Denver, said his nonprofit agency partners with communities to do solar projects to supply solar power. The organization helps serve low-income households in rural areas, trains workers in the industry and along the way has helped 15,000 homes go solar.

“The solar industry is growing and the industry is in desperate need of really good trained employees,” he said.

Grid Alternatives made a presentation to the metro district Wednesday.

The Denver group is a non-profit and says they want to help reduce people's power bills.

Jake Bobrow of GRID Alternatives of Denver said his non-profit agency partners with communities to do solar projects to supply solar power. The organization helps serve low income households in rural areas, trains workers in the industry and along the way has helped 15,000 homes go solar.

“The solar industry is growing and the industry is in desperate need of really good trained employees,” he said.

United Nations data indicates that 80% of the people displaced by climate change are women. Immediately after natural disasters, like Hurricanes Maria and Katrina, reporting shows that women face an uptick in gender-based violence and harassment.

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