Sponsors

Bridge House, which was selected as one of the five state nonprofits out of more than 150 applications for $175,000 apiece in funding from the tech giant, this month received the most votes in an online contest to earn another $125,000.

There were more than 7,000 votes cast in the contest.

The $300,000 in new funding for Bridge House will be used to expand its Ready to Work program, which attempts to end homelessness through connecting clients with employment training and opportunities.

Boulder’s Family Learning Center, which is working to mentor and tutor 40 low-income parents in early childhood development, child educational advocacy and early childhood professional development, and Bridge House, the local homelessness services provider behind the Ready to Work program that strives to end homelessness through employment, are competing against three Denver groups for the extra funding.

Kanyon Martinez, a member of the Bishop Paiute Tribe, was about to graduate from Bishop Union High School in Bishop, California, last year when he heard about an internship possibility with Grid Alternatives — a nonprofit organization that brings solar installations to low-income communities, including tribes.