Honoring our Tribal Partners

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October 08, 2020
Collage of 4 photos featuring tribal members and solar installations. Text reads: honoring our tribal partners, Indigenous Peoples' Day

Greetings, relatives,

It is more critical than ever to recognize and acknowledge the contributions of tribal communities to climate action and activism, and energy innovation and resilience, all the while facing disproportionate environmental and public health impacts of COVID-19. At GRID Alternatives, we are proud of our tribal partnerships and programs, which are led by tribal staff who are passionate about supporting tribal communities in the transition to a clean energy future. 

Our team is extremely proud of indigenous communities and leaders who have made solar photovoltaic (PV) and other renewable energy technologies a source of strength and resilience while providing cost-savings and awareness to their communities. Since 2010, GRID and the Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund have built relationships and provided solar to 60+ federally recognized tribes resulting in:

  • 7.3 MW of clean solar PV installations
  • Over 800 Native American families served
  • $48.8 million in lifetime energy savings
  • Eliminated 136,192 tons of greenhouse gas emissions
  • 1,820 Tribal members trained in solar installation

In addition, we have partnered with a variety of community leaders and training organizations - from local high schools to tribal colleges and universities - to provide students with hands-on solar training and connections to local solar companies; offer workshops and energy efficiency education to tribal members; and to introduce students to renewable energy and a potential long term career path. 

Solar Spring Break participants pose for a selfie in front of the Ojo Encino Chapter House.
This year, as we observe Indigenous Peoples’ Day, we honor our tribal partners, job trainees, and volunteers—often on the front lines of climate change—for their innovation and leadership in transforming their communities through the benefits of renewable energy and for defending Mother Earth.

In a good way,

Adam Bad Wound (Oglala Lakota) 
Founder, Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund

Tanksi Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota/Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota) 
Director, Tribal Solar Accelerator Fund

Tim Willink (Navajo)
Director, National Tribal Program