News

This year, we witnessed unprecedented federal, state and utility investments in transportation electrification and equity. This means that implementers, the people and agencies responsible for using these funds, are working to ensure that implementation and program design drive substantial, measurable benefits to individuals and families that need them the most. But what does it really mean to go beyond "checking the box" for equity? And how will new investment dollars, allocated to implement equitable clean mobility programs, drive measurable benefits for income-qualified households?
Since 1998, Trolly Trestle in Chula Vista, California, has offered affordable transitional housing for former foster youth and homeless youth while they finish school or complete job training. GRID's HQ Multifamily and Commercial solar team recently installed a 25.6 kilowatt system on the transitional housing center.

GRID aims to connect mission-driven organizations like Trolley Trestle with clean energy tools that maximize benefits for underserved communities, including integrating workforce development opportunities.
As one of the nation's largest nonprofit providers of quality, affordable housing, Volunteers of America (VOA) is one of our mission-aligned partners at GRID Alternatives. VOA manages income-qualified housing, and they are a leader in providing housing for seniors. Learn more about how GRID Alternatives has installed solar panels on VAO projects: East Cliff Village, Valley Oaks, and Rolling Oaks!
Sierra Schultz (she/her) works on the HQ Construction team as a Commercial Project Manager. She joined GRID in 2021, with a background in Civil Engineering and experience in managing Heavy-Civil Construction projects. Her role focuses on climate justice through engineering and project management. Sierra has managed PV installations throughout California, while co-leading two affinity groups at GRID.
Recently, GRID installed 20 off-grid solar-powered refrigerators for families in the Kumeyaay communities of Juntas de Neji and San Antonio Necua with support from Sempra Foundation. Refrigeration allows families to keep food, beverages, and medicine cold without having to drive 20-40 minutes to a nearby town to buy ice. The solar systems immediately save families time, money and improve health.
“I believe climate change represents both one of the greatest threats to our way of life, but also one of the greatest opportunities for economic development and job creation, and I do believe tribes can and should lead the way to a clean energy transition.” Waleah Johns, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs